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Tag Archives: new york city

20 Sexy Shots from New York’s M.E.A.T. Party (NSFW)

20 Sexy Shots from New York’s M.E.A.T. Party (NSFW) On Saturday, Jan. 14, Tel Aviv’s DJ Aron packed the dance floor of New York’s B.B. King’s main room with sexy men, and Hornet—the world’s premier gay social network—was there to join the party. This was the third of four events thrown by international party duo John Blair and Jake Resnicow in which Hornet powered the party’s VIP experience. Perks included access to on-site masseurs who were giving massages to partygoers between dance breaks. The app was also giving away free premium upgrades. The event was wall to wall with men in their best gear. From harnesses to jockstraps, attendees left their clothes at the door with their coat. Go-go boys...

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Theatre Review: “tick, tick…BOOM!”

This pop-rock musical gets most of its pungency from the score’s lively, inventive songs. tick, tick…BOOM! is also haunted by the fact that it’s an autobiographical musical from the late composer of Rent, Jonathan Larson. This gives the existential angst lead character Jonathan feels a particular edge. tick, tick…BOOM! tells the story of an ambitious composer anxiously pondering where his career and life are headed as he approaches his 30th birthday. His girlfriend wants to get married and move out of the city, his best friend has found happiness switching from being an unsuccessful actor to a successful marketing exec, but Jonathan is still waiting on tables and trying to write the great American musical. The score has tons of innate urgency...

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Opera Review: “Jenůfa”

For me, the luminous sound of the score is the main appeal of Jenůfa, the watershed 1904 Czech opera by Leoš Janáček. In the current revival at the Met, Conductor David Robertson delivers a gorgeously polished account of the piece, making singers and orchestra feel almost like a single virtuoso instrument. Finnish soprano Karita Mattila is the established star here, playing the title character’s stepmother, the Kostelnička, the moral guardian of the small village in which they live. She delivers on her reputation, singing with great clarity and passion, but it’s a credit to the quality of this production that she doesn’t particularly stand out. Oksana Dyka is equally marvelous as Jenůfa, a victim of the village’s hypocrisy – a role which helped Mattila...

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Interview: Justin Sayre

The Meeting* hosted by Justin Sayre – the monthly gathering of the International Order of Sodomites, a fictional “centuries-old organization which sets the mythic Gay Agenda” – will come to an end at the conclusion of its upcoming season. After seven years of audacious humor, trailblazing political discourse and button-pushing cultural exploration, the acclaimed comedy/variety show will be presented for the eighth and final season from September 2016 through May 2017 at Joe’s Pub at The Public Theater. The Fall 2016 season shows are Sunday nights at 9:30pm and will feature tributes to gay icons Bette Midler (October 23), and Angela Lansbury (November 20), with the 8th Annual Holiday Spectacular! being held December 18. There will also be a November 5 show at Oasis in San Francisco. I...

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Theatre Review: “Heisenberg”

When looking for someone to adapt his novel The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Mark Haddon specifically sought out playwright Simon Stephens because of his “heart of flint.” That captures Stephens’s cool and clear-eyed observation of people with all their flaws, but it misses the underlying optimism in his writing that creates such an exciting tension with his flinty surfaces. His specific brand of guarded optimism was indeed exactly what was needed for Curious Incident, and is once again on surprisingly heartening display in his own play Heisenberg. In a London train station, Georgie (Mary-Louise Parker) spots Alex (Denis Arndt), a man several decades her senior, and plants a kiss on his neck. Nothing is quite as it seems...

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CD Review: “The Gay Agenda” – Justin Sayre

Gayest comedy album ever! Justin Sayre’s The Gay Agenda is made up of stand up excerpts from The Meeting*, a live variety show Sayre hosts. In his role as Chairman of the Board of the International Order of Sodomites, Sayre addresses a variety of subjects related to the gay community with take-no-prisoners verve and venom. In a persona that is femme yet tough, brassy and bellowing, this gay’s got issues with gays that got issues, be it lusting after straight men, worshiping idols that aren’t worthy of us, thinking the struggle is over because of gay marriage, or being awful to younger gays. In the album’s lightest moment, he alternates with Michael Musto in describing delightfully absurd pitches for Sex and...

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Cabaret Review: Latrice Royale

Latrice Sings! And she’s actually pretty damn good at it! There’s no attempt at giving you “girl singer” – “Barry White in drag” is how she describes her basso stylings – but she clearly models her approach to song interpretation on the likes of Ella Fitzgerald and Aretha Franklin. She may not have the pristine vocal instrument of those titans, but she certainly understands their lessons in musicality and expression. And her take on cabaret standard “Here’s to Life” (also the name of the show and her CD) marks the first time I’ve heard it as a determined look at the future rather than a wistful look back. Here’s to Life is solidly in the mold of traditional autobiographical cabarets. It’s...

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Cabaret Review: Norbert Leo Butz

Norbert Leo Butz is a very smart and intensely gifted actor, who could probably do an astonishing turn in Hamlet. As fate would have it, he has become primarily known as a musical comedy actor of prodigious energy and daring. In his cabaret show, “Girls, Girls, Girls” we find Norbert trying to sort out his relationships with the women in his life – and there are a lot of them: three daughters, three sisters, a wife and ex-wife, mothers-in-law, 17 nieces. He takes advice from a feminist professor friend, who suggests he reads up on feminine archetypes. He does, and for the rest of the act goes through a catalog of songs that match up these archetypes. “Girls, Girls, Girls” is a very thoughtful show...

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Cabaret Review: Lena Hall

In some ways I’m the ideal target audience for Lena Hall’s current cabaret show. I don’t know how many other people would be so delighted that she chose to do the Sex Pistols’ nihilistic masterpiece “Holidays in the Sun” in that high society boîte, the Cafe Carlyle. And sing it more beautifully than Johnny Rotten could ever hope to, while still preserving the sense of gleeful, feral rage that is so essential to the song. When Hall is singing full-throated rock and roll, which is most of the show, she is an unquestionable fierce ruling diva. The subject matter of this show, titled “Oh! You Pretty Things”, is a thumb-sketch of Hall’s love life from her teenage years to today. Hall...

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Theatre Review: “Turn Me Loose”

This deserves the widest audience possible! It’s both one of the most important and funniest shows I’ve seen in quite some time, and this is in a year that also included the especially pungent and humane The Humans. Named after the final words of civil rights leader Medgar Evers, Turn Me Loose is sharply focused on one of the sharpest wits and minds of the past hundred years, African-American comedian and activist Dick Gregory, played with equal parts panache and passion by Joe Morton. One of the greatest talkers of his time, Gregory provides playwright Gretchen Law with abundant material, from both his stand up and his numerous speeches and interviews on behalf of the civil rights movement. She has successfully distilled it all...

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Theatre Review: “Blackbird”

I have very mixed feelings about this play. I often look at shows through the lens of my work as a stage director – I ask myself, would I want to spend several weeks of rehearsal in the world of this play. Blackbird is a play I would never want to direct, I decidedly would not want to spend all that time with Ray and Una, who had a sexual relationship when he was an adult and she was 12. That said, I do recognize Blackbird as a powerful piece of theatre, and this production as an accomplished one. It’s definitely a juicy meal of “actor meat” for two adventurous performers, and the leads in this production, Jeff Daniels and Michelle Williams, tear into it with gusto...

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NYPD Cold Case Squad Trying to Solve Murders of Dion Webster, Kevin “Kiki” Freeman, and Ali Forney

The NYPD’s Cold Case Squad has announced they are looking into the murders of three LGBT individuals from the 1990s in hopes of finally solving the decades-old crimes. The three individuals are Ali Forney (after whom the Ali Forney Center was named), Dion Webster, and Kevin “Kiki” Freeman. The New York Daily News reports:  “If I held my breath, I would turn blue and die,” Carl Siciliano, executive director and founder of the Ali Forney Center said. “But if it happened it would be significant to the transgender community moving forward in terms of being able to have their needs treated with respect in society.” The NYPD confirmed its Cold Case Squad has been tasked with trying to solve the murders of...

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Theatre Review: “Disaster!”

When the willfully silly Disaster! is funny, it’s one of the funniest shows in town. Plus, you will simply not hear the 1970s disco and pop rock songs that make up its score sung better anywhere – in some cases they outshine the original. Broadway musician and comedian Seth Rudetsky got together with director Jack Plotnick to write this loving tribute to disaster movies of the 1970s (The Poseidon Adventure, The Towering Inferno, etc.). They’ve added an extra thick layer of camp, making Disaster! musically to 1970s pop rock what Rock of Ages is to hair metal. Rudetsky also plays “disaster expert” Ted, who everybody thinks is crazy for predicting Manhattan’s first floating casino and discotheque is destined for all kinds of trouble...

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Theatre Review: “The Humans”

This is a major play, no doubt about it, but what a lot of critics and commentators seem to have missed is what a deeply political play it is. It focuses on the Irish-American Blake family, who have come to youngest daughter Brigid’s (Sarah Steele) sketchy tenement Chinatown apartment (a “duplex” by virtue of extending into a basement) to celebrate Thanksgiving. All of them are dealing with serious problems of one sort or another, which they face with a mix of willful but warm good humor and stoic endurance. What struck me was the lack of any social safety net to help them with their problems. Even the arguably most affluent family member, lawyer sister Aimee (Cassie Beck), has no defense against being fired for...

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Jonathan Warman directing P!nk musical reading

GaySocialites cultural correspondent Jonathan Warman will direct a developmental reading of the new musical Mean at Emerging Artists Theatre . The musical, with book by Kerri Kochanski (1,001 People That Suck, The Food Monologues), features music and lyrics by Grammy Award winning pop icon Alecia Moore (aka P!nk). The workshop features choreography by Liz Piccoli (Spandex the Musical), and musical direction by Luke Williams. Mean tells the story of Jinx, an up and coming rock star in Hollywood, using some of P!nk’s biggest hits as its soundtrack. The reading is open to the public and will take place on Saturday, May 30th at 2:00 PM at the TADA Theater, 15 West 28th Street in NYC. The cast features Rock of Ages star Justin Mortelliti (Broadway World Award...

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Theatre Review: “The Audience”

Helen Mirren playing Queen Elizabeth II in a script by Peter Morgan is some kind of magic formula. It worked wonders in the film The Queen, and that alchemy works equally well in the new stage production The Audience. The Audience is based on the fact that British Prime Ministers have a weekly audience, or private meeting, with the monarch. The play imagines a series of pivotal audiences from Winston Churchill to David Cameron, as each Prime Minister uses these confidential conversations as a sounding board and a confessional – sometimes intimate, sometimes explosive. The play’s chronology is non-linear, starting with John Major (1990-1997) and following a trail of themes and memories that make sense of both monarch and monarchy. Slowly, a central conflict...

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Theatre Review: “On the Twentieth Century”

Witnessing Kristen Chenoweth at the top of her form and perfectly cast is the whole reason to see this revival. The show’s creators, composer Cy Coleman and wordsmiths Betty Comden and Adolph Green, were all masters of musical theatre, but On the Twentieth Century is nobody’s best work. Don’t get me wrong, the musical is very entertaining and quite well-crafted, but it finally works best as a star vehicle. And, thank goodness, Chenoweth is one hell of a star! Chenoweth plays bawdy and chic Hollywood star Lily Garland, whom bankrupt theater producer Oscar Jaffee (Peter Gallagher) wants to cajole into playing the lead in his new, yet-unwritten epic drama. This madcap pursuit takes place aboard the Twentieth Century, a luxury train travelling...

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Theatre Review: “Wolf Hall”

The reign of English king Henry VIII (1509-1547) – full of palace intrigue and illicit lust – is the stuff of soap opera. It has already produced several popular television series, including the early 1970s miniseries The Six Wives of Henry VIII and the even more popular late 2000s Showtime drama The Tudors. Most recently, Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall novels about Henry’s political representative Thomas Cromwell have become very popular indeed, inspiring both a miniseries and this stage adaptation. At its best, this version carries you along like the trashiest soap. Thank goodness that Wolf Hall sustains that suspenseful, brisk pace for much of its long running time. Those moments when the pace slackens are truly dangerous, as one may be lulled into an...

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Theatre Review: “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf”

This revival of Edward Albee’s masterwork is perhaps the most lucid and clear production of the play I’ve ever seen, and I’m ambivalent about that. Don’t get me wrong, this is a very accomplished production

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